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U.S. women get creative in fighting abortion stigma

Amelia Bonow, co-creator of #ShoutYourAbortion, poses in a photo taken in Seattle, WashingtonFor Amelia Bonow, having an abortion left her relieved that she was not forced to become a mother but, still, she kept her story mostly to herself. Amid a nationwide wave of political vitriol about abortion and the realization that she and her friends had long kept their abortions secret, however, she reached a tipping point and broke her Omerta-like silence. "Hi guys! Like a year ago I had an abortion," she posted on Facebook last fall.



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Snapchat raises $1.81 billion in new funding round

Snapchat logo image created with Post-it notes is seen in the windows of Havas Worldwide offices at 200 Hudson street in lower Manhattan, New York during "Post-it note war"(Reuters) - Messaging app Snapchat Inc has raised $1.81 billion in an equity offering, indicating strong investor interest in the company despite concerns that it is struggling to attract advertisers. Snapchat did not disclose its valuation in the latest round of funding in its filing on Thursday. (http://1.usa.gov/1Xz2x2n) However, technology website TechCrunch reported on Monday, citing sources, that the company could be valued at about $20 billion. ...



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Automakers, tech companies decide to make deals, not war

File photo of a driver displaying Uber and Lyft ride sharing signs on his car windscreen in Santa MonicaBy Joseph White and Paul Lienert DETROIT (Reuters) - A flurry of deals between big automakers and ride hailing and transportation startups is rewriting the playbook in the contest to control the future of personal transportation. Automakers now recognize they may turn ride-hailing services and car sharing companies into steady customers for all sorts of vehicles, particularly hybrid and electric cars, industry executives and analysts say. Tie-ups with carpooling services or short-term rental companies help automakers expose consumers to brands they might otherwise ignore.



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China online lending crackdown shutters Guangdong P2P site

Chinese 100 yuan banknotes are seen in this picture illustration taken in ShanghaiA large Chinese online lending platform accused of illegal operations has suspended operations, one of hundreds that have been shut this year by the government, as China cleans up a sector ridden with stories of Ponzi schemes. Police in Huizhou, Guangdong province, said on Wednesday night that it had detained 13 executives from Guangdong Huirong Investment Co's peer-to-peer lending platform esudai (www.esudai.com). The detainees included its legal representative and chairman Jian Huixing.



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Faced with strict laws, Brazilian women keep abortions secret

By Sophie Davies RIO DE JANEIRO (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Years after giving into family pressure and having an illegal abortion, one Brazilian woman says she is haunted by the secret procedure so taboo that hardly anyone will talk about it. The woman, who only wants to be identified as F.D., went to a clinic hidden away in the southern state of ParanŠ for an abortion when she was a student. Roughly one million women each year seek abortions to end unwanted pregnancies in Brazil, where abortion is illegal except in cases of rape or incest or if the life of the mother is in danger.
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Exclusive: Bangladesh probes 2013 hack for links to central bank heist

bangladeshBy Krishna N. Das and Ruma Paul DHAKA (Reuters) - Bangladesh police are reviewing a nearly forgotten 2013 cyber heist at the nation?s largest commercial bank for connections to February's $81 million heist at the country's central bank, a senior law enforcement official said on Wednesday. The unsolved theft of $250,000 at Sonali Bank involved fraudulent transfer requests sent over the SWIFT international payments network. It is not widely known outside of Bangladesh, and in fact was treated as a cold case until Bangladesh police revived the investigation after thieves in February also used the SWIFT network to steal $81 million from Bangladesh Bank.



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Chocolate bar wrappers ignite German row over racism

The image of German soccer player Jerome Boateng is printed on a Ferrero chocolate bar box in BerlinBy Michael Nienaber BERLIN (Reuters) - Online debate raged in Germany on Wednesday after supporters of anti-Islam group Pegida criticized a confectioner's decision to print images of non-white soccer players on its chocolate bars instead of the usual picture of a blond-haired, blue-eyed boy. Italian confectionery group Ferrero has temporarily changed the pictures on its 'Kinder Schokolade' (Children Chocolate) in Germany to celebrate the European Soccer Championship, which kicks off on June 10 in France. The new packaging shows childhood pictures of players such as Jerome Boateng, son of a Ghanaian immigrant, and Ilkay Gundogan, whose parents were born in Turkey.



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Cringin': British youth unimpressed with pro-EU campaign video

British Union flags fly in front of the Big Ben clocktower of The Houses of Parliament in central LondonBy Estelle Shirbon LONDON (Reuters) - A campaign video urging young Britons to "make sure you're #VOTIN" to stay in the European Union in a June 23 referendum backfired on Wednesday, with some young people denouncing it as patronizing. Produced by the official "In" campaign, the new video aims to motivate young people to turn out on referendum day.



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EU seeks to make it easier to buy online from other countries

An eBay sign is seen at an office building in San Jose, CaliforniaBy Julia Fioretti BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Online retailers would be banned from stopping a customer in one EU country buying from a website based in another, under a proposal issued on Wednesday to make it easier for consumers to shop across the bloc. The European Commission said its law would stop "geoblocking" where companies limit access to their websites based on user location, often forcing customers to use versions based in their own country, sometimes with higher prices. "In the online world, all too often consumers are blocked from accessing offers in other countries," the Commission said in a statement.



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Twitter drops photos, videos from 140-character limit

A man reads tweets on his phone in front of a displayed Twitter logo in Bordeaux, southwestern FranceTwitter said the change, part of its efforts to simplify its microblogging service, will happen in the next few months. "A few simple changes to make conversations on Twitter easier! And no more removing characters for images or videos!" Chief Executive Jack Dorsey said in a 115-character tweet. Twitter's stock touched a record low at $13.72 on Tuesday, while investor sentiment around Twitter stock plunged on social media, according to Reuters data.



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EU unveils plans to boost e-commerce, overhaul broadcasting rules

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The European Commission unveiled on Wednesday proposals aimed at making it easier for the 500 million consumers in the European Union to make online cross-border purchases, as part of a strategy to boost e-commerce in the 28-country bloc. The recommendations also require online video streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon to bear some of the production cost of European works either by directly investing in them or by paying into national funds. The proposals need approval from the 28 EU countries and European Parliament before they can become law.. ...
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With social media, 'we could have saved more lives'

Members of Sri Lankan military rescue team work at the site of a landslide at Elangipitiya village in AranayakaBy Amantha Perera ARANAYAKE, Sri Lanka (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - For the first 48 hours after a huge landslide wiped out his hometown of Aranayake and buried 220 families, Prabath Wedage was on his mobile phone constantly. "I have not been off the phone for five minutes," said Wedage, who has been trying to coordinate consignments of relief supplies for 1,700 displaced people in 13 emergency shelters, including Rajagiri School, where he normally works. In this devastated community ? as in many disaster-hit places ? the ubiquitous mobile phone and its social media apps are becoming a vital tool for relief and rescue workers, officials and families to share and gather information and keep in touch.



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Telstra says $1.6 billion Autohome stake sale is being challenged by minority shareholders

A man and power lines are reflected in a Telstra poster adorning a public telephone in Sydney, AustraliaAustralia's Telstra Corp Ltd on Wednesday said its $1.6 billion sale of a controlling stake in Chinese website operator Autohome Inc to Ping An Insurance Group Co of China Ltd is being challenged by minority shareholders. The telecommunications firm said it intends to contest a petition some minority shareholders filed in the Cayman Islands. It did not identify the shareholders or elaborate on their objections.



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Hacker who exposed Hillary Clinton's email server expected to plead guilty

Lehel, alleged hacker "Guccifer", is escorted by masked policemen in Bucharest, after being arrested in AradA Romanian computer hacker who revealed the existence of a private email server used by Hillary Clinton when she was secretary of state is expected to plead guilty to hacking-related offenses, a U.S. law enforcement official said on Tuesday. Accused hacker Marcel Lazar, who used the alias "Guccifer," is scheduled to enter a guilty plea at a hearing early on Wednesday before Judge James Cacheris in U.S. District Court, Alexandria, Virginia, said the official. The official and another person familiar with the Guccifer investigation, who asked not to be named ahead of the proceedings, said Lazar's plea would not validate claims he has made in recent media interviews about successfully hacking the email server Clinton installed at her home in Chappaqua, New York.



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New York inmate photo makes it to Facebook, despite cellphone ban

A corrections officers walks through the Enhanced Supervision Housing Unit at the Rikers Island Correctional facility in New YorkThe New York City Department of Corrections said on Tuesday it was investigating what appears to be a photo of inmates from Rikers Island jail taken with a cellphone, a device banned in city jails. It was not clear how the group of male inmates was allowed to pose, who snapped the photo, or how it was uploaded to Facebook as reported by the New York Post on Monday. It was the latest in a string of problems, from a spike in violence to a crackdown on corrections officers running contraband networks, facing the department run by Commissioner Joseph Ponte since 2014.



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Saudi Arabia's rulers adapt message for social media age

Saudi men explore social media on their mobile devices as they sit at a cafe in RiyadhBy Sylvia Westall and Angus McDowall DUBAI/RIYADH (Reuters) - The participation of tens of thousands of young Saudis in a social media debate over plans to reform the kingdom's oil-reliant economy last month marked a shift in how Riyadh's conservative rulers interact with their subjects. Saudi Arabia's dynastic leaders, who rule by fiat and strictly limit public dissent, have historically courted public opinion only via informal councils with tribal, religious and business leaders or citizens seeking to petition them. "It's a new focus for the government as it reaches out to a young Saudi population that is more likely to use social media," Saudi analyst and commentator Mohammed Alyahya said.



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Japan an alluring target for Standard Bank ATM thieves

People stand outside 7-Eleven convenience store outside headquarters of Seven & I Holdings in TokyoThe gang used counterfeit Standard Bank credit cards to withdraw 1.4 billion yen ($13 million) in 14,000 transactions from ATMs at 7-Eleven convenience†stores over three hours on a Sunday morning, according to a source familiar with the matter.



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Up against strict laws, Texas women learn do-it-yourself abortions

Susanna was young, single, broke and pregnant in southern Texas where, thanks to the state's strict laws, her chances of getting a surgical abortion at a clinic were slim to none. With the help of a friend, some online instructions and quick dash across the Mexican border for some pills, she addressed the issue of unwanted pregnancy in a state where women are finding abortion services too expensive and too far away. Restrictive laws took hold in Texas in 2013, forcing so many clinic closings that fewer than 20 remain to serve 5.4 million women of reproductive age.
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SWIFT to unveil new security plan after hackers' heists

Photo illustration of the SWIFT logoBy Huw Jones and Tom Bergin LONDON (Reuters) - The SWIFT secure messaging service that underpins international banking said on Tuesday it plans to launch a new security program as it fights to rebuild its reputation in the wake of the Bangladesh Bank heist. The Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT)'s chief executive, Gottfried Leibbrandt, told a financial services conference in Brussels that SWIFT will launch a five-point plan later this week. In February, thieves hacked into the SWIFT system of the Bangladesh central bank, sending messages to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York allowing them to steal $81 million.



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Temasek sees no sharp rebound in global startup valuations

Temasek Holdings logo is seen at their office in SingaporeFunding for global tech startups should return,even if valuations don't rebound to their 2015 levels as investors press for less inflated values, a senior executive at Singapore state investor Temasek [TEM.UL] said. Lured by a potential market for app-based, on-demand and logistics-heavy businesses, venture capitalists and others have thrown billions of dollars to startups that often need only cash and a working app to enter the fray. "We have seen that slowdown because valuations are adjusting in Silicon Valley, they have adjusted in China, in India.



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Facebook changes policies on 'Trending Topics' after criticism

A Facebook logo is pictured on an Apple's Ipad in Bordeaux, southwestern FranceBy Yasmeen Abutaleb SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Facebook Inc said on Monday that it had changed some of the procedures for its "Trending Topics" section after a news report alleging it suppressed conservative news prompted a U.S. Congressional demand for more transparency. The company said an internal probe showed no evidence of political bias in the selection of news stories for Trending Topics, a feature that is separate from the main "news feed" where most Facebook users get their news. Earlier this month, a former Facebook contractor had accused the company's editors of deliberately suppressing conservative news.



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Facebook says no evidence of political bias found on 'Trending Topics'

A Facebook logo is pictured on an Apple's Ipad in Bordeaux, southwestern France(Reuters) - Facebook Inc said on Monday that an investigation into its editorial practices had found no evidence of political bias in the selection or prominence of stories shown on its Trending Topics feature. The company also said the investigation revealed that conservative and liberal topics were approved as trending topics at "virtually identical rates" and it was unable to substantiate any allegations of politically-motivated suppression of particular subjects or sources. (http://bit.ly/1Tvv3Nm) (Reporting by Sangameswaran S in Bengaluru; Editing by Mary Milliken)



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Hackers probe defenses of Middle East banks : FireEye

A magnifying glass is held in front of a computer screen in this picture illustration taken in BerlinHackers are probing the defenses of banks in the Middle East, targeting employees with infected emails which gather information about the banks' network and user accounts, FireEye researchers said.† FireEye, a U.S. cyber security company investigating the February attack on Bangladesh's central bank in which hackers stole $81 million, said there was no apparent connection with the heist or related attacks on banks in Ecuador and Vietnam. A FireEye spokesman said Qatar National Bank was not one of the "several banks" in the Middle East where researchers had found the malware.



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Microsoft to crack down on content promoting extremist acts

A Microsoft logo is seen at a pop-up site for the new Windows 10 operating system at Roosevelt Field in Garden CityBy Sarah McBride SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - With the world growing more concerned about attacks by militant groups on civilians, Microsoft Corp on Friday outlined new policies to crack down what it called "terrorist content" on some of its consumer services. In a blog post, the company said it would ban what it called "terrorist content" on some services such as gaming tool Xbox Live, the consumer version of its Outlook email service, and its consumer documents-sharing service. "We will consider terrorist content to be material posted by or in support of organizations included on the Consolidated United Nations Security Council Sanctions List that depicts graphic violence, encourages violent action, endorses a terrorist organization or its acts, or encourages people to join such groups," the blog post said.



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Gun used to kill Trayvon Martin sold for $250,000: TV reports

Handout photo of the handgun that was used in the shooting death of Trayvon MartinZimmerman could not be reached to verify the reports by KTNV in Las Vegas and WOFL in Orlando. Zimmerman was acquitted of second-degree murder and manslaughter charges in the shooting, which sparked heated debates over race relations, gun control and justice in the United States. In a statement on†Twitter†after the bidding closed on Wednesday, United Gun Group defended its decision to host the auction and said it would have no further comments.



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SWIFT tells banks to share information on hacks

Photo illustration of the SWIFT logoBy Tom Bergin LONDON (Reuters) - International financial messaging service SWIFT told clients on Friday to share information on attacks on the system to help prevent hacking, after criminals used SWIFT messages to steal $81 million from the Bangladesh central bank. Earlier on Friday, Reuters reported that Wells Fargo, Ecuador's Banco del Austro (BDA) and Citibank, whose managing director, Franchise Risk & Strategy, Yawar Shah, is SWIFT's chairman, did not inform SWIFT of an attack last year in which more than $12 million was stolen from BDA. The network is considered the backbone of international finance but faith in its security has been rocked by the theft from Bank Bangladesh's account at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.



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Macedonian extradited to face U.S. charges on selling card data

By Nate Raymond NEW YORK (Reuters) - A Macedonian citizen was extradited to the United States on Friday to face charges related to his operation of a website called Codeshop that authorities say was responsible for selling the data of thousands of credit cards from around the world. Djevair Ametovski, 29, was arrested in Slovenia in 2014 and was extradited from there to face charges including aggravated identity theft and wire fraud conspiracy contained in a criminal complaint filed in federal court in Brooklyn, New York. Ametovski, who authorities say was known online as "codeshop," "sindrom" and "sindromx," is expected to appear in court on Saturday, prosecutors said.
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Cyber thieves exploit banks' faith in SWIFT transfer network

Photo illustration of the SWIFT logoBy Tom Bergin and Nathan Layne LONDON/CHICAGO (Reuters) - Shortly after 7 p.m. on January 12, 2015, a message from a secure computer terminal at Banco del Austro (BDA) in Ecuador instructed San Francisco-based Wells Fargo to transfer money to bank accounts in Hong Kong. Over 10 days, Wells approved a total of at least 12 transfers of BDA funds requested over the secure SWIFT system. The SWIFT network - which allows banks to process billions of dollars in transfers each day - is considered the backbone of international banking.



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Factbox: How do bank payments work in the euro zone?

Cyber attacks on banks from Bangladesh to Ecuador are raising questions about the security of the global payment system and one of its key components, the SWIFT messaging network. Following is a basic explanation of how bank payments work in the euro zone: WHAT HAPPENS WHEN I MAKE A PAYMENT? Most bank payments in the euro zone are settled via the Target 2 payment system, owned and managed by the European Central bank and the national central banks (NCBs) of euro zone countries.
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Tortoise in a baby stroller a novelty even for New Yorkers

Henry, an African spurred tortoise, peeks out of his stroller on 110th street in New York, U.S., May 19, 2016.By Gina Cherelus NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York City is filled with oddities that can surprise even the most die-hard New Yorkers and when Henry the tortoise turned up in a stroller in Central Park this week for his daily outing it turned more than a few heads. The 17 pound (7.7 kg) sulcata tortoise is the pet of 24-year-old Amanda Green who lives in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan. New Yorkers are accustomed to dog walkers but no so much tortoise walkers, so Green expected only a few responses.



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Apple boss to meet India's Modi and his gold iPhone

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an event at Apple headquarters in Cupertino, CaliforniaBy Himank Sharma MUMBAI (Reuters) - When Apple Inc CEO Tim Cook meets Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi this weekend as part of an Asian tour aimed at boosting sales, he will sit down with a man whose penchant for a selfie - often using his gold iPhone - can get him into trouble. Modi breached electoral rules when he photographed himself holding his party's symbol of a lotus flower immediately after casting his vote in the 2014 general election, one of the many selfies he regularly takes with his Apple phone. Cook meets the 65-year old prime minister in New Delhi on Saturday, and will be hoping Modi's enthusiasm for phones can help Apple as it tries to bolster sales in India.



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Netflix, Amazon face EU quota on European works

The Netflix logo is shown in this illustration photograph in Encinitas, California(This May 19 story removes incorrect reference to Netflix being subject to French 60 percent quota in paragraph 13) By Julia Fioretti BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Online video streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime will be required to devote at least a fifth of their catalogs to European content under proposals set to be announced next week. The European Commission is planning an overhaul of the European Union's broadcasting rules to bring in EU-wide minimum quotas in a bid to boost the circulation and funding of European films and television shows. On-demand services will have to ensure they have at least a 20 percent share of European works in their catalog and ensure their "prominence", according to a draft of the proposed Audiovisual Media Services Directive seen by Reuters.



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Canada PM Trudeau says 'I am human' after fracas, cites job pressures

Canada's PM Trudeau takes part in an interview in OttawaBy Andrea Hopkins and David Ljunggren OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, under fire for getting involved in an unprecedented physical fracas in Parliament, said on Thursday that he was only human and in a high pressure job but promised there would be no repeat of his actions. Trudeau, impatient at what he saw as stalling tactics by the opposition ahead of a vote on Wednesday evening, crossed the floor in the House of Commons to grab one legislator and drag him to his seat, accidentally elbowing another in the chest.



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Top Democratic senator probes SWIFT, NY Fed about Bangladesh heist

The corner stone of The New York Federal Reserve Bank is seen in New York's financial districtThe Senate Homeland Security Committee's top Democrat sought information Thursday from global financial network SWIFT and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on steps being taken to bolster cyber security in the wake of the theft of $81 million from the central bank of Bangladesh. Senator Tom Carper of Delaware requested that both answer questions and brief his staff by June 17 on how they were handling issues following the February heist, during which hackers wired money out of an account at the New York Fed held by Bank Bangladesh, as well as how they were safeguarding against other potential cyber threats. "These cyber attacks raise important questions about the security of the SWIFT system and the ability of its members to prevent future attacks," Carper wrote in his letters.



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UK Supreme Court upholds press ban in celebrity threesome case

A general view shows Court Three in the United Kingdom's new Supreme Court building in Westminster, central LondonBy Estelle Shirbon LONDON (Reuters) - Britain's Supreme Court on Thursday upheld an injunction preventing the English press from naming a celebrity who was involved in a much publicised extra-marital threesome. In a four-to-one majority ruling, the Supreme Court said that even though the threesome story was easily accessible online, allowing publication in English newspapers would lead to a "media storm" with increased intrusion into the lives of the main protagonist, his spouse and their two young children. London-based tabloid newspapers, which have a long history of publishing stories about the sex lives of celebrities, reacted with fury, with the Sun calling the ruling "draconian" and the Daily Mail branding it "ludicrous".



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Google appeals French order for global 'right to be forgotten'

People pose with laptops in front of projection of Google logo in this picture illustration taken in ZenicaBy Julia Fioretti and Mathieu Rosemain BRUSSELS/PARIS (Reuters) - Alphabet Inc's Google appealed on Thursday an order from the French data protection authority to remove certain web search results globally in response to a European privacy ruling, escalating a fight on the extra-territorial reach of EU law. In May 2014, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruled that people could ask search engines, such as Google and Microsoft's Bing, to remove inadequate or irrelevant information from web results appearing under searches for people's names - dubbed the "right to be forgotten". Google complied, but it only scrubbed results across its European websites such as Google.de in Germany and Google.fr in France, arguing that to do otherwise would set a dangerous precedent on the territorial reach of national laws.



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Singapore banks' group invites SWIFT to discuss cyber attacks

File photo of the logo of the Monetary Authority of Singapore at its building in SingaporeThe Association of Banks in Singapore (ABS) has invited SWIFT for a meeting in June to discuss the latest cyber attacks on banks in Bangladesh and Vietnam which involved SWIFT's financial messaging service. The move comes as members of ABS, which include Singaporean and foreign banks, have individually engaged the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT) since news of the attacks emerged, it said. "ABS, for its part, has invited SWIFT to a meeting in early June to share its experience in managing the incidents in Bangladesh and Vietnam," it said an email to Reuters.



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Bangladesh Bank official's computer was hacked to carry out $81 million heist: diplomat

John Gomes, Bangladesh's ambassador to the Philippines is flanked by Bangladesh officials as they appears in a money laundering hearing at Senate in ManilaA Bangladeshi central bank official's computer was used by unidentified hackers to make payments via SWIFT, and carry out one of the biggest-ever cyber heists, a Bangladeshi diplomat said on Thursday at the end of a Philippine Senate inquiry. There were certain indications about who the hackers were, Bangladesh Ambassador John Gomes told a panel looking into how the $81 million in stolen money ended up in the Philippines, citing information shared by the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Gomes said the hackers were neither in the Philippines nor in Bangladesh, but he had no other information.



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Exclusive: UK banks ordered to review cyber security after SWIFT heist

Members of the public walk past the Bank of England in central LondonBy Andrew MacAskill and Jim Finkle LONDON (Reuters) - The Bank of England ordered UK banks to detail steps taken to secure computers connected to the SWIFT bank messaging network about two months after a still-unidentified group used the system to steal $81 million from Bank Bangladesh, according to three people familiar with the effort. The central bank sent the request to update cyber security measures to all banks it regulates in mid-to-late April, according to these people, who were not authorized to discuss the confidential communications. The previously unreported action marks the earliest known case of a†central bank in a major economy to order its member banks to conduct a formal security review in response to the Bangladesh theft, which has shaken the global system for transferring money among both commercial and central banks.† The Bank of England, one of the G10 central banks that oversee Brussels-based SWIFT, said it had no immediate comment.



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House lifts block on Google-hosted apps, Yahoo Mail remains blacklisted

An illustration picture shows logos of Google and Yahoo connected with LAN cables in BerlinBy Dustin Volz WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. House of Representatives' information technology team this week reinstated access on its internet network to software applications hosted on a Google cloud service after the company addressed potential security fears, according to an email seen by Reuters. Yahoo Mail remains inaccessible, however, and has been blacklisted since the House Information Security Office said in an April 30 memo it had detected an increase of ransomware attacks on the network. Devices connected to the House's internet via Wi-Fi or ethernet cables were barred from accessing appspot.com, the domain where Alphabet Inc's Google hosts custom-built apps, on May 3 due to concerns about a potential security vulnerability identified publicly by the FBI in June 2015.



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